How to Clean a Toothbrush that Fell in the Toilet | Step by Step Guide

There are a lot of reasons why toothbrushes might fall in the toilet. Maybe you forgot to put them back in the dishwasher when you were done, or maybe your toddler just decided to throw their toothbrush in there. Whatever the reason, it’s time to get a new toothbrush. But how to clean a toothbrush that fell in the toilet? And what kind of cleaning method should you use?

How to Clean a Toothbrush that Fell in the Toilet

How to Clean a Toothbrush that Fell in the Toilet
  • Soak it overnight in Listerine (or diluted sodium peroxide or high-proof alcohol), boil it for about 5 minutes in a bit of water, then rinse and dry/clean the bristles with a baking soda/water mixture. 
  • To clean a dropped toothbrush, rinse it with water, soak it in Listerine, and then dip it in a 3 percent hydrogen peroxide solution. Fecal matter is pretty nasty (from a bacteria standpoint, it’s pretty harmful for consumption), and toothbrushes are cheap. Just go out and buy a new one.
  • When you flush, a mist of water vapor deposits tiny particles of feces all over the bathroom, including your toothbrush.

Your toothbrush is unsanitary. 

Unless you’re one of the few civilized individuals who flush the toilet seat down, it’s also covered in feces. What’s the reason? The rapid water flow swirling around the toilet bowl creates a massive vortex of tiny feces particles. This mist spreads throughout the bathroom and ends up settling on all surfaces, even the bristles of the toothbrush.

There is no debate about whether to leave the seat up or down: flushing the seat up spreads germs.

Three methods to dispose of feces

If you’re comfortable with the idea of using light to kill bacteria on your toothbrush, UV disinfection devices range in price from $11 for a handheld device to $47 for a wall-mounted multi brush cleaner.

It must be soaked in hydrogen peroxide: 

For a less expensive option, the ADA reports that a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution has been shown to kill up to 85% of toothbrush germs.

Impregnate it with Listerine: 

According to the American Dental Association, Additionally, Listerine brand mouthwash destroys up to 85 percent of bacteria on your toothbrush, making it the most appropriate treatment option if you already use one. 

Rinse your toothbrush under the faucet.

When your toothbrush falls on the floor, the first thing you should do is immediately pick it up, remove the debris with your hand and rinse it with water. The hairs, dirt, and dust will fall off almost immediately. The sooner you clean it with water, the fewer bacteria are likely to thrive.

Is it acceptable to throw away a toothbrush that has fallen on the floor?

According to Bonham Dental, it releases particles that coat your toothbrush when you flush the toilet. 

If you have a rechargeable electric toothbrush, you can replace the top at any time, making it an excellent option if it falls on the floor.

It’s not worth putting your toothbrush in contact with feces and other bodily fluids. 

Microorganisms in your mouth

Your mouth is a breeding ground for numerous microorganisms, especially in an unbrushed mouth. Each time you brush your teeth, a small number of bacteria from your mouth may be left on the toothbrush. Since the toothbrush is usually moist, it attracts bacteria and provides an ideal growing environment.

If you store your toothbrush next to the sink, it can become contaminated when you wash your hands and water splashes on the toothbrush.

Avoid using plastic containers.

Although you may think that the solution to having a cleaner toothbrush is to store it in an airtight plastic container, this is not the case. This prevents the toothbrush from drying out between uses, leading to mold and mildew. If several toothbrushes are stored together, bacteria can be passed from one brush to another; it is complicated if one home member is ill.

How to keep a toothbrush clean?

How to Clean a Toothbrush that Fell in the Toilet
  • Change your toothbrush frequently.
  • Choose the right toothpaste. 
  • Avoid interchanging brushes. 
  • Always close the toilet lid. 
  • Allow air to circulate the brush. 
  • Start by rinsing your mouth with mouthwash.

Comments are closed.