How to Fix a Running Toilet | Pro Tips You Must Know Now

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If you hear water running inside your toilet when it hasn’t been flushed, chances are you have a leak, but don’t panic; it’s a simple solution, which we’ll show you how to do. Let’s learn how to fix a running toilet.

The first step is to locate the leak’s source. Two distinct components could be at fault. The filler valve is often referred to as a flapper valve.

Remove the flapper from the toilet and store it securely in a flat area where it will not break.

If water flows continuously into the tank and the overflow pipe, you probably have a fill valve that requires adjustment or replacement.

How to Fix a Running Toilet

How to Fix a Running Toilet

Fixing a running table was never being easier.

  • First, switch off the toilet’s water supply via the shut-off valve situated behind the toilet.
  • Locate the supplied nut located on the bottom of the cistern that allows water to enter the fill valve and turn it counterclockwise to loosen it.
  • By turning the fill valve retaining nut counterclockwise with your adjustable pliers, remove it from the bottom of the tank.
  • Disconnect the fill line from the overflow and completely remove the fill valve from the tank.

If the water flows intermittently but does not reach the overflow, you probably need a new trap door.

To begin, close the shut-off valve on the water supply.

Reach into the toilet cistern and gently separate the flapper from the two bolts on either side of the flush valve, then disconnect the chain from the flush lever.

Thread the holes on each side of the new flapper over the two bolts. If the flapper does not seat properly, adjust the chain length as necessary.

Finally, replace the toilet cistern lid, and that concludes the procedure. Your annoying toilet leak has been resolved.

Consider a fill valve problem; you will need to adjust the float if you see an interruption of the water flow. 

Bottom line

You most likely leak if you hear water running inside your toilet without flushing it. Two distinct components could be creating the issue. If the water continuously flows into the tank and the overflow pipe, your fill valve probably needs adjustment or replacement.

Using a screwdriver, you can adjust this screw at the top of the device. It will sink further if you turn it counterclockwise one more time. This is going to be lifted counterclockwise. Regardless of how you do it, you want the water level to be about a half to an inch lower than the fill valve. As a result, we’ll flush once more to ensure that the water is where we want it. Now you know how to operate a float valve of this type.

To ensure there are no more leaks, make sure the water level is adequate. It’s time to move on to step three if steps one and two haven’t yielded any results for you yet. You’ll want to check the fill valve for a broken one. With water coming out of places it shouldn’t, it’ll look like this.

Moreover;

This can be remedied easily. Watch one of our other videos, and we’ll walk you through the process of installing a new fill valve at a reasonable price. Those are the three most common causes of a leaky toilet. If the problem persists, you’ll need to call a plumber, but if these three issues can’t be resolved on your own, you can rest assured that you won’t be hearing any more leaks.

Check the water supply and flush the toilet to determine if you fixed the leak. For instance, your fill valve has likely failed. Your only option then is to exchange it for a new unit.

This is undoubtedly a more involved process than the previous steps. Doing so considerably extends the life of your toilet. And if your bathroom is ancient, it’ll likely make its water consumption a lot more efficient.

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